Posts tagged interview
Featured Artist: Tama Gucci
tamagucciwwwifi.png

All hail Tama Gucci, music full of resilient grace! Each lyric stands as a torch filled with honesty in the face of emotional closure. Rescuing you from dead memories and screaming farewells, he tells it like it is and what you see is what you get—a cultural icon of unchained intimacy. Tama adds a new definition to blackness and masculinity. A queer beauty and defiant angelic voice who shares in our interview that he will fight until the bitter end of love. 

 Most of his dance+music videos he edits himself. His virtual background effects prove that "escaping" doesn’t mean leaving reality, it’s being present in reality. These videos seem almost ritual, reaching deep within to achieve a change in his own realization. At first glance, his IG feed looks so surreal, as if he had one foot in a different place that belongs to a dream. His style creates visceral experiences, whether its modeling, performing, producing, or hosting parties. Playing across these dymanic worlds, he can switch into a sci-fi character or gain visibility through fashion and fantasy. Tama is someone who can hide dark secrets behind a smile—a smile that also breaks open an understanding of human tenderness. 

Despite the cold front hitting Miami during Art Basel, meeting Kymani (Tama Gucci) was one of the warmest encounters. The trip was also worth my shitload of outfit errors bracing the frightful winds as I got to visit my BFF from college, Thamar aka Tami T, a Women.Weed.WiFi contributor and owner of plugstation. I am thankful she was able to join the interview and is hip and passionate about connecting to the culture of artists who stay real out there, too. We drove down to Biscyenne to pick up Kymani. Originally I had planned to have the interview where I was staying, at Motel Bianco on their urban outdoor patio, but it was extremely brick out. So, instead we hotbox Tami’s car with Kymani and instantly hit it off. Three glamorous Leos smoking a strain called Jungle Cake. We were so high we didn’t start driving for another 30 minutes. Laughing uncontrollably like we would at one of those royal dinner parties. 

On our way to a sit down spot, Kymani gives us his cute clothing haul of the day and thrift store recommendations. Revealing pockets of funny and personal stories about his siblings, and along the way he also surprises us with an unreleased track. Tami and I were geeked to be the first ears to listen when he took over the aux chord. Kymani is so sweet, his kindness could excuse him from returning any favors. It was a such a treat to connect... We finally arrive to our destination in Wynwood, Miami’s art district, to a bar called Gramps. Low neon lights, chill baby lizards gawking, and a live all-vinyl set that you can hear in our recorded convo. Hope you enjoy our favorite Tama Gucci song picks mixed with our personal scoop of what Tama Gucci is about. Included: WORLD PREMIERE EXCLUSIVE WOMEN.WEED.WIFI TRACK! 

Cheers

~J-NASTY~

Special thanks to: 

@theonlytamit for co-hosting and 

@stoneyspice for mastering the mix 

Artist Spotlight: Camille Urso (@brasiliangold)
photo: @photosbydarrin

photo: @photosbydarrin

This artist spotlight comes from our recent editorial tour of the west coast. While in Oakland we stopped to chat with the beautiful and powerful, Camille Urso, also known to the internet world as @brasiliangold. Through her posts Camille uses her voice to spread messages of body and sex positivity, her love for the (divine) feminine, and calls bullshit on all the fuckery directed not only toward her for being unapologetic, but also toward all women as a symptom of patriarchy. In addition to using social media, Camille published a book called Whorticulture, which is a series of 'poetic non-fiction' that documents her experiences surrounding the feminine body and sexuality, rape culture, and personal freedom.

When she opens the door to her crib (affectionately dubbed the Pussy Palace) she does not differ too much from how she appears in her posts, except where some people appear smaller IRL, Camille actually radiates more. Her energy is as her name indicates, gold, but rather than blinding light reminiscent of the sun, her gold is in the elemental form --- dense, grounding, and the real deal. 

photo: @veraskyy

photo: @veraskyy

Earlier that day she was in the gym, like she usually is, testing her physical strength, but also taking notes for a women's self defense class she hopes to start in the near future. Empowering women physically is as important as empowering mentally, since violence is a reality that all women face. Camille recounts the time when she saw her abusive ex-boyfriend and beat him up and robbed him. "Honestly, I wish I would've killed him," she says, roach clip from mom in hand.While some people tell her violence is not the answer and other such things that are said to all people who systematically and consistently endure violence, she thinks that is bullshit. "Why would you be more upset at me taking revenge than what he did to me?" Valid question most should ask themselves more. She writes in one of her posts:

violence was the answer for my abuser, for my rapist, for every man that has physically grabbed me. They didn’t speak my language of passivity and rationale. Me bowing my head and accepting the blows and then explaining my hurt did nothing...Now that he sees we speak the same language, he is afraid of me because I have shown that I speak it better. I speak it harder. I speak it faster. The tables have turned to proper face, and now he fears me as he should have all along.
photo: @veraskyy

photo: @veraskyy

So, how do the dudes that follow her react to her? Well, they come for the pics, but usually stay for more. "I don't care if dudes are jerking off to my pictures, eventually they are going to read my words, and it'll have them stop and reflect, even if it's just for a little." But also, as is often the case with people who are born to crush others, be it based on their privilege as male or privilege as white, many think there is no way she is talking about them. Clearly some other dude. Some other white person. No, all of you. Camille rolls her eyes at them, and also warns about guys who claim to be allies. "A lot of them know what to say and not say to stay acceptable to [women like us], but they'll do the same 'dude' shit when given the opportunity." 

photo: @photosbydarrin

photo: @photosbydarrin

As hinted at through the title of her book, Camille looks to nature for guidance and believes it holds the key to how the human gender balance should work as well. "Everything in nature has the female species on top---from the hunting, the birthing/caring of the young. Why would humans be different?" Because of this Camille feels strongly about a certain f-word and made a point of requesting that we, "not use the word feminism anywhere near my name." While feminism is a good start for some, Camille finds it weak and a label that allows people to be content with resting on an ideal of equality. "Personally, I don't want to be equal to men. Feminism is a construct of patriarchy in itself." 

Feminism is a sham, something for the nice, privileged, educated, middle class ladies with regard for touching the faith in essential goodness of Daddy and policemen. I’m out to destroy your system, not attain certain rights within it.
— @brasiliangold post

Support Camille in her mission to dismantle the patriarchy through purchasing her book here, and following her on Instagram where you can stay tuned for what she has in store. 

~Kenya Kush~

Artist Spotlight: DONORMAAL
Benecia King x Women.Weed.WiFi

Benecia King x Women.Weed.WiFi

In the internet persona age where the cool black kids get 2000 likes on glossy tumblr pics of their Basquiat crown tattoo at AfroPunk Festival and white teenage girls have 60.5m followers with @kingwhateva as a handle name, few actually sport a crown. DoNormaal shows up to one of her many shows doing just that with the tall, shiny regalia atop her lavender box braids, a brown shearling coat and some fucked up Chuck Taylors. The crown was not a tiara, nor was it a subtlety. What was subtle was any sign of outward egoism from the bearer. DoNormaal sported the crown with the ease of someone born into a royal bloodline--a natural born king or queen, rather than with the desperation for recognition all too common from artists and millennials. After all, when you have been wearing an invisible crown of guiding light your whole life, the leap to bearing a physical one is small, though symbolic.

DoNormaal aka Christy to her homies, is aware of her invisible crown and has been since a child. She describes the phenomenon as simply always understanding that she had to try her best. As a child, that mentality often grasps for tangible goals and accomplishments--whether it be doing well in school, sports, pleasing your parents, or even rebellion. As we move further into adulthood and our capacities for growth and achievement expand, we realize that one interpretation of this inner desire to always improve might be called something like "God." Though many haters do not like to hear people (especially young people of color) call themselves a god or messiah (take, for example, the endless backlash Kanye West receives for his bravado), where is the blasphemy in recognizing a higher source within yourself and using it to guide your life and illuminate others? This power is what allows DoNormaal, who is a visual and auditory contradiction of regality and grunge, to command respect wherever she makes her presence.

Benecia King x Women.Weed.WiFi

Benecia King x Women.Weed.WiFi

Benecia x Women.Weed.WiFi

Benecia x Women.Weed.WiFi

You have to accept death in order to do anything
— DoNormaal
Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

How then does a young queen stay humble? Well, for starters there's the constant pimp hand of capitalism that slaps us all if we fail to live up to its expectations. Meaning, that in order to survive and thrive, DoNormaal works a physically strenuous job during the day and often finds herself too tired to create afterwards (sounds familiar, right?) and lacking in energy to devote to her projects.  For this reason she loves the stage, "the songs are already written," she chuckles explaining her favorite thing to do. "I just try to do what I do in the mirror onstage," she elaborates. The decision to be the same behind closed doors as you are with bright lights on you leaves a performer incredibly vulnerable with all flaws and weaknesses on display. This vulnerability, this rawness is what DoNormaal is after with her craft and feels many artists are also gravitating toward in their own work. 

The bravery and humility to step onstage over and over again despite the possibility of rejection comes from DoNormaal's acceptance of death. "You have to accept death in order to do anything," she preaches during a smoke session in her quiet, low-tone voice. Understanding the inevitability of your death and that it occurs to everyone without prejudice, makes the insecurities that ordinarily prevent you from acting bravely irrelevant.  After all, there's no need to stroke or protect a dying ego. ~ ~ ~

Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

Chris Hill x Women.Weed.WiFi

Words: Amanya Maloba

Stylist: Janice Ibarra

Clothes: Moksha Seattle and Seamlessly Supernatural

Photographers: Benecia King and Chris Hill

Artist Spotlight: YA$$A

What is your creative process?
I usually feel most creative in the mornings. I’ll wake up with an idea or a fresh thought, especially when it’s sunny out. I open the curtains, put on some Spanish or Brazilian music, and get to the most important part of my ritual — making a mint latte. I use mashed mint leaves, espresso, sugar, and almond milk. I’m okay without it, but I know I’m not gonna have a good day if I have a mediocre cup.

Is it better than sex?
Is coffee better than sex? Yeah, because it lasts longer.

CONTINUE READING ARTIST SPOTLIGHT HERE: INTERVIEWS